Watch This Video Now: The Secrets of Successful Business Communication Instruction

Business Communication Instruction with a Mobile Communication Component

Are the authors of the business communication textbook you've adopted still pretending mobile communication doesn't exist?

Be Sure Your Textbook Has Full Coverage of Mobile Business Communication by 2016

For business communication instruction, take advantage of an abundance of useful teaching materials for your business communication course. We suggest you visit these websites: Google+, Reddit, YouTube, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. These sites will provide great assistance in business communication instruction.

Visit this page to order an examination copy of a Bovee & Thill textbook.

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Business Communication Instruction: Textbooks Show Surprising Differences

business communication instruction

A new video shows the surprising differences among textbooks authored by Courtland Bovee and John Thill, and their competitors. For example, only Bovee and Thill offer groundbreaking coverage of mobile communication. This is critical because students live in a mobile world–and they’re about to enter a workplace where mobile has gone mainstream–so any business communication course that aims to stay relevant must incorporate mobile.

Bovee and Thill also prepare students with the knowledge and skills they will be expected to have when they enter tomorrow’s workplace. The authors write the only texts that explain the new social communication model that is revolutionizing the way businesses communicate.

Courtland Bovee says, “We offer a clear, consistent, and integrated approach to teaching writing using the three­-step process.” The three-­step process is uniformly applied throughout each book and is adapted to each message form.

As someone responsible for business communication instruction,read the full article from NBC Right Now.

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Business Communication Instruction

As Another Disruptive Technology Transforms Business Communication Instruction

The history of business communication instruction over the past couple of decades has been one of almost constant change. The first major wave was the digital revolution, replacing much of the print communication of the past with email, instant messaging, web content, and other new forms. Then came social media, which fundamentally redefined the relationship between businesses and their stakeholders. And now comes the third wave, and it’s proving to be every bit as disruptive—and full of exciting possibilities—as the first two.

        Mobile communication, and mobile connectivity in the larger sense, is changing the way business communicators plan, create, and distribute messages. Mobile devices are overtaking PCs as the primary digital communication tool for millions of consumers, employees, and executives, and businesses that don’t get mobile-friendly in a hurry will fall behind.

        For business communicators, the shift to mobile involves much more than the constraints of small screens and new input technologies. The ability to reach people anywhere at any time can be a huge advantage, but the mobile communication experience can also be a major challenge for senders and receivers alike. It requires new ways of thinking about information, message structures, and writing styles. With the notion of radical connectivity, for example, many communication experiences are no longer about “batch processing” large, self-contained documents. Instead, communication is taking on the feel of an endless conversation, with recipients picking up smaller bits of information as needed, in real time, from multiple sources.

The fundamental skills of writing, listening, presenting, and so on will always be essential, of course, but those skills must be executed in a contemporary business context. That’s why Bovée and Thill texts carefully blend technology awareness and skills with basic communication skills and practices. The new coverage of mobile communication is deeply integrated throughout their textbooks, with major new sections in many chapters and important updates in other places, along with a variety of new questions, activities, and cases. Welcome to the wild new world of mobile business communication!


Why Business Communication Instructors Continue to Choose Bovée and Thill

The reasons instructors throughout the world choose texts by Bovée and Thill can be summarized as follows:

  • Market-leading innovation. The unique new coverage of mobile communication in this edition is just one example of how for more than three decades, Bovée and Thill texts have pioneered coverage of emerging trends and their implications for business communication. They were the first authors in the field to give in-depth coverage to digital media, then social media, and now mobile communication.
     
  • Up-to-date coverage that reflects today’s business communication practices and employer expectations. Technology, globalization, and other forces have dramatically changed the practice of business communication in recent years, even to the point of altering how people read and how messages should be constructed. To prepare students for today’s workplace, the business communication course needs to address contemporary skills, issues, and concepts.
     
  • Practical advice informed by deep experience. Beyond the research and presentation of new ideas and tools, Bovée and Thill are among the most active and widely followed users of social media in the entire field of business communication. They don’t just write about new concepts; they have years of hands-on experience with social media, blogging, content curation, search technologies, and other important tools. They are active participants in more than 45 social media sites.
     
  • Engaging coverage of real companies and contemporary issues in business communication. Bovée and Thill texts emphasize companies and issues students already know about or are likely to find intriguing. For example, cases in recent editions have addressed location-based social networking (the business communication implications of the FourSquare game app), employer restrictions on social media, and the use of Twitter in the job search process.
     
  • Integrated learning. In sharp contrast to texts that tack on coverage of social media and other new topics, Bovée and Thill continually revise their coverage to fully integrate the skills and issues that are important in today’s workplace. This integration is carried through chapter-opening vignettes, chapter content, model documents, end-of-chapter questions, communication cases, and test banks to make sure students practice the skills they’ll need, not just read about them in some anecdotal fashion.
  • Added value with unique, free resources for instructors and students. From the groundbreaking Real-Time Updates to Business Communication Headline News to videos specially prepared for instructors, Bovée and Thill adopters can take advantage of an unmatched array of free resources to enhance the classroom experience and keep course content fresh

There has been a revolution in business communication instruction in the past few years. As demonstrated here, the only authors who have fully responded to this revolution are Bovée and Thill. For a wealth of material you'll find useful for teaching a course in business communication, we suggest you review these websites: Google+, Reddit, YouTube, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

Also see Business Communication Instruction with a Mobile Component.

Thank you for watching this video about business communication instruction.

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Business Communication Instruction: Textbooks Have Wide Gap in Coverage

business communication instruction

An analysis of digital, social, and mobile media in business communication textbooks reveals Bovée and Thill’s superb coverage far exceeds the coverage found in competing texts, which in comparison is shockingly incomplete and out of date. If you are responsible for business communication instruction, be sure to read the full article from ABC 6 News.

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Bovee and Thill: Leading Textbook Authors in Business Communication Instruction

Bovee and Thill have led the business communication instruction field for more than 30 years with innovative, high-quality textbooks that have consistently been on the leading edge. They were the first to

Textbook Support                                        

  • cover digital media
  • cover social media
  • cover mobile business communication
  • cover essential communication technologies as they went mainstream in the business world, such as email, blogs, microblogs (Twitter), data visualization, e-portfolios, infographics, text messaging, and virtual meetings
  • cover business etiquette
  • cover communication in a diverse world and recognize the importance of diversity in photographs and exhibits
  • cover developing presentations in a social media environment
  • cover enhancing presentations with slides
  • discuss and show pictures of real companies and to include a Company Index
  • write chapter-opening vignettes to help students see how real professionals use chapter concepts and skills
  • write about real companies in exercises and cases
  • include cases that involve the full range of contemporary business media, from blog posts to text messaging
  • cover digital video as a major business communication medium
  • create the name and concept for "Letters for Analysis"
  • create the name and concept for "Document Makeovers"
  • create the name and concept for “On the Job” business communication simulations
  • receive an Award for Excellence from the Textbook Authors Association for a business communication textbook

  
Instructor Support and Interaction

  • become active and widely known users of emerging digital media, developing hands-on experience that is reflected in their textbook content
  • have a business communication blog
  • offer a business communication news service, Business Communication Headline News, for adopters and their students
  • provide Real-Time Updates, a web-based service featuring the latest articles, videos, PowerPoints, infographics, websites, and podcasts to adopters and their students, categorized by the chapters in Bovee & Thill's textbooks
  • offer online magazines, 10 in all, each one dedicated to an important business communication topic along with a weekly newsletter of the most popular articles
  • offer a Business Communication Pictorial Gallery on Pinterest
  • have a business communication channel on YouTube
  • have a Teaching Business Communication group on LinkedIn and on Facebook (with a combined membership of over 4,300 instructors)
  • be on Twitter as business communication authors
  • offer dozens of business communication slide programs that they've created (available on SlideShare)
  • to email a video newsletter several times each semester
  • have a website that focuses on instruction, “Teaching Business Communication”
  • have been recognized for their contributions to the field by the Governor of Massachusetts and the Boston Red Sox.
     

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then Bovee and Thill should be proud, because they’re the most imitated authors in the field. Their texts set the standard by which other textbooks in the field are judged. For outstanding business communication instruction, there simply are no other texts to be considered.

Bovee and Thill have the most extensive collection of free resources for instructors and students in the history of business communication publishing. You can see the full list at http://blog.businesscommunicationnetwork.com/resources.

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27 Ways the Business Communication Course Can Help Your Students

In your class you’ll probably be emphasizing the long-term value of the business communication course to your students. Here’s our list of 27 ways communication skills can help students in their personal and professional lives.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: blog.businesscommunicationnetwork.com

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Test Your Proofreading Skills

Get your proofreading game on! Three challenges await you. A hint about the number of errors, followed by the solutions, appears at the end of the tests. Test 1: The Note of Thanks Dear Krista; Thank you very much for…

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How to Write When You Can’t Change Things

I led a class for a group of writers who respond to citizen complaints about airplane noise. The writers cannot make the planes quieter, and they can’t make them go away. What can they do? They can respond in ways…

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Things Changed–Is Your Style Guide Up to Date?

While you have been busy working, some of the rules of writing evolved, and the University of Chicago Press released a new Chicago Manual of Style. Take a look at the changes below to determine which ones you need to adopt. Then update your company style guide to be sure everyone is writing consistent, up-to-date pieces.

For this post, I consulted The Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago), published in September, The Associated Press Stylebook 2017 (AP), Garner’s Modern English Usage (Garner’s)which was published in 2016, and Microsoft Manual of Style (Microsoft)published in 2012.

1. Words with web are no longer capitalized and are sometimes closed up: website, webmaster, webcam, and webcast, but web address and web browser. AP, Garner’s, and Microsoft recommend webpage, but Chicago still prefers the open web pageAP (effective 2016), Microsoft, and Chicago use the lower case web as a short form of World Wide Web, but Garner’s uses Web for that purpose.

2. You can stop capitalizing internet if you follow Chicago—or AP, which changed its approach in 2016. However, Garner’s and Microsoftstill capitalize it.

3. The ever-present word email should be lower case and closed up. That’s according to Chicago, AP (effective 2011), and MicrosoftGarner's lists three versions—E-mail, e-mail, and email—noting that “The unhyphenated email is unsightly, but it might prevail in the end.” (Might? It certainly will!) Other e words are generally not capitalized unless they appear at the beginning of a sentence or in a heading, and they are hyphenated: e-book, e-reader, e-commerce, e-form, e-learning.

4. The word voicemail is closed up according to AP (since 2016) and Garner's. However, Microsoft and Chicago render it open: voice mailChicago doesn’t single out voice mail for discussion, but its rules on compound words call for the word to be rendered open.

5. Using they as a singular pronoun has become acceptable in some cases. The Washington Post argued in late 2015: “Allowing they for a gender-nonconforming person is a no-brainer. And once we’ve done that, why not allow it for the most awkward of those he or shesituations that have troubled us for so many years?”

AP chimes in on the awkwardness issue. In its 2017 edition, APstates, “They/them/their is acceptable in limited cases as a singular and/or gender-neutral pronoun, when alternative wording is overly awkward or clumsy.” For example, to avoid revealing an individual’s gender, this their is acceptable: “The employee believed their safety could not be guaranteed.”

Chicago now states: “While this usage [they, them, their, andthemselves] is accepted in those spheres [speech and informal writing], it is only lately showing signs of gaining acceptance in formal writing, where Chicago recommends avoiding its use. When referring specifically to a person who does not identify with a gender-specific pronoun, however, they and its forms are often preferred.”

Garner’s recommends its careful use: “Where it can’t be avoided, resort to it cautiously because some people may doubt your literacy.” And Microsoft advises, “Although . . . they for a singular antecedent is gaining acceptance. . . . Whenever possible, write around the problem.”

Note: The singular they always takes a plural verb, just as you does.

6. Over = more than for quantities. In 2014, AP joined Chicago andGarner’s in accepting over as synonymous with more than. Example: “She has over 20 years of experience.” AP describes over as "acceptable in all uses to indicate greater numerical value.” However, Microsoft still recommends more than for quantities; it uses over “to refer to a position or location above something.”

7. One space—not two! This isn’t a recent change. As far back as 2004, virtually all style guides have dictated one space after end punctuation and colons. If you are still using two, it’s time to adapt. Remember what happened to the dinosaurs.

8. In the 21st century, there’s no reason to render a number both spelled out and in figures—not even in contracts. Consider these redundancies: “You may cancel the contract within three (3) days” and “A deposit of $250 (two hundred fifty dollars) is due upon signing.” In the very old days, numbers were repeated to prevent them from being altered, according to attorney Bryan Garner. And back in the days of fuzzy carbon copies, spelled out numbers were easier to read. Today there’s no need for them. 

I shared the changes above with a friend who wrote back: "I prefer eLearning. It still seems an unsettled question." Not to me! With so many things unsettled in the world, I'm going to defer to the style manuals and get on with my life. 

How about you and your editorial team? Do you follow the advice of a well-respected style guide? Or do you go it alone? 

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Timber! (or Timbre?)

I just finished reading another excellent mystery by Louise Penny: The Beautiful Mystery. Penny's series of Inspector Gamache mysteries, which take place in Québec, gets better and better with each volume. I'm always looking forward to the next one. 

This time I read a library book. To my surprise, a previous reader wrote in the book, something I rarely see in books from the library. The individual wrote timbre over this bit of dialogue:

"Well, I have an unusual singing voice. A strange timber." 

Would you have caught the error–and annotated it? I was glad the previous reader had. It helped me recognize the correct spelling of timbre. 

Definition of timbre: the combination of qualities of a sound that distinguishes it from other sounds of the same pitch and volume.

Definition of the more familiar timber: trees or wooded land considered as a source of wood. Wood used as a building material; lumber. 

I was glad to relearn this correct spelling. And to find out at the end of the book who had killed the prior!

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